QCARC Calendar

March 2019
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April 2019
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Polls

Should QCARC continue giving VE Exams before club meetings in even months?

  • Yes, but occasionally on other days and times (67%, 2 Votes)
  • Yes (33%, 1 Votes)
  • No (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Yes, with more months (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Yes, but fewer months (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 3

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QC Weather

Partly Cloudy
Monday 12/24/2018 20%
Partly Cloudy
Clearing skies late. Lows overnight in the mid 20s.
Overcast
Tuesday 12/25/2018 10%
Overcast
Cloudy skies. High 33F. Winds light and variable.
Overcast
Wednesday 12/26/2018 20%
Overcast
Cloudy. High 38F. Winds W at 5 to 10 mph.
Quad-County Weather Page

December 2018 Parasitic Emission

The latest edition of the Parasitic Emission QCARC newsletter is now available for your reading pleasure. Continue reading below, or click on the link to download the PDF file.

If you would like to receive the Parasitic Emission each month delivered to your inbox, please send an email to: subscribe@qcarc.org

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2019 Club Dues

It’s that time again… Time to renew your Quad-County membership!

If you’re not a member yet, there’s no time like the present to join! We’ll be happy to count you in as a member of our little group!

Click below to get a copy of the 2019 application, which you can fill out on your computer and print a nice, clean, completed copy to send in with your dues.

If you can see your way clear to volunteer to be a “Dime-A-Day Donor” our club would be very grateful to you! This completely optional plan is NOT a requirement, just a suggestion if you are feeling generous.

In any case, click below for the Application, Fill it out and send it in with your check to:

QCARC
PO Box 599
DuBois, PA  15801

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TONIGHT’S MEETING CANCELLED

Due to the Penn State DuBois Campus being closed because of weather, tonight’s QCARC meeting is cancelled.

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November 2018 Parasitic Emission

The latest edition of the Parasitic Emission QCARC newsletter is now available for your reading pleasure. Continue reading below, or click on the link to download the PDF file.

If you would like to receive the Parasitic Emission each month delivered to your inbox, please send an email to: subscribe@qcarc.org

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October 2018 Parasitic Emission

The latest edition of the Parasitic Emission QCARC newsletter is now available for your reading pleasure. Continue reading below, or click on the link to download the PDF file.

If you would like to receive the Parasitic Emission each month delivered to your inbox, please send an email to: subscribe@qcarc.org

 

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September 2018 Parasitic Emission

The latest edition of the Parasitic Emission QCARC newsletter is now available for your reading pleasure. Continue reading below, or click on the link to download the PDF file.

If you would like to receive the Parasitic Emission each month delivered to your inbox, please send an email to: subscribe@qcarc.org

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Paul Silinsky K3PS – Silent Key

It is with deep sadness we report the passing of Paul Silinsky K3PS.

Dr. Paul Stephen Silinsky K3PS of Ashland, Ohio, formerly of DuBois Pennsylvania, died following a brief illness on Saturday, May 5, 2018. He was Lecturer at The Ohio State University — Agricultural Technical Institute in Wooster, Ohio, and served as Adjunct Faculty at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio and North Central State College in Mansfield, Ohio. He managed the family business, Keystone Electric Motor Repair Co. in DuBois, before moving to Ohio.

He was born in DuBois May 12, 1948, the son of Stephen A. and Connie I. (Zaykosky) Silinsky. He was a graduate of Central Catholic High School in DuBois, Pennsylvania, and graduated Cum Laude from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a BS in Physics. He received Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from West Virginia State University for his work in Solid State Physics.

He retired from the United States Naval Reserve with the rank of Commander, and served in the Civil Air Patrol as a pilot and Squadron Commander, retiring as Lieutenant Colonel.

He was a licensed Radio Amateur beginning in 1962 with the callsign KN3ZDR, and later K3ZDR and K3PS. He was a founding member of the Quad-County Amateur Radio Club in DuBois, and was a long-serving officer, performing the duties of President, Secretary, and Treasurer during the first 20 years of the club’s history.

He was responsible for the Quad-County repeater, WR3AGV (later K3PS) and served as an officer of the Western Pennsylvania Repeater Council.

He is survived by his wife, Tonda Nalle Silinsky, and is remembered by his many students and friends. Private funeral arrangements in Ashland, Ohio are incomplete.

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April 2017 Parasitic Emission

In a shocking development, Joe W3BC has finally come to his senses and put out a modest but informative edition of the Parasitic Emission newsletter. You may download it here:

Parasitic Emission, Volume 43, Number 1, April 2017

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Contact Your US Senators AGAIN! Important!!!

Amateur Radio Parity Act Logo_1111/15/2016

ARRL once again is calling on its members to urge their US Senators to support the Amateur Radio Parity Act (H.R. 1301) when it comes up in the Senate during the “lame duck” session of Congress that adjourns in mid-December. The House of Representatives approved the bill in September, but if the Senate does not follow suit, the bill will die, and the entire process will have to be repeated. ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee and has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward, said today, “The clock is ticking!”

“We begin the e-mail campaign once again, as the US Senate returns to work this week after a month-long hiatus,” Lisenco said. “We were just beginning to build momentum in the Senate following the unanimous passage of the Parity Act in the House when Congress shut down for the 4 weeks prior to Election Day.”

The task is simple: Go to our Rally Congress page, enter your ZIP code, fill in your name and address, press enter, and e-mails will go directly to your Senators. Members may do this, even if they have already contacted their US Senators for support.

“We have to remind our legislators that we are still here and that we need the Amateur Radio Parity Act to become law,” Lisenco stressed. “We must to do this now as we have, at most, only 4 weeks left in the session to get the bill passed this year. Otherwise, we will have to begin the entire process in 2017 with a new 115th Congress.”

There are no guarantees, Lisenco said, and we are subject to the political bickering that goes on daily between the parties, despite the fact that the bill is truly a bipartisan effort. “In order to have a chance at overcoming political obstacles that have little or nothing to do with the legislation, we need our voices to be heard,” he said. “And we need that input today!”

September’s victory in the US House was the culmination of many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect efficient outdoor antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301, and ARRL’s relentless and strident efforts on Capitol Hill that this bill made it this far.

As the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”

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YOU Can Help: Amateur Radio Parity Act

To The Members of the Atlantic Division,

We have an opportunity to positively affect Amateur Radio for years to
come. H.R. 1301, the Amateur Radio Parity Act, has unanimously passed
the House of Representatives and moved on to the Senate for
consideration. All you need to do is spend two minutes of your time to
send an email to your two Senators supporting the Bill. By doing so,
you will have helped the future of Amateur Radio by guaranteeing our
ability to have an effective outdoor antenna in a deed-restricted
community.

The number of people living in such communities grows exponentially
each year. Often, a ham homeowner has no choice but to live in a
community restricted by covenants. There are nearly 3/4 of a million
licensed hams in the United States, more than ever before. But that
may change if we are forced to live in a community that refuses to
allow an antenna.

Help yourself and help your fellow hams. Go to this link:

https://arrl.rallycongress.net/ctas/urge-senate-to-support-amateur-radio-parity-act

Enter your zip code and follow the prompts. The letters are there.

All you need to do is fill in the blanks, hit save, then send.

That’s it. Less than 2 minutes and you’re finished.

If you haven’t yet done so, please do so today.

Your voice counts!

Thank you.

73, Tom, W3TOM

ARRL Director – Atlantic Division
(301) 257-6225
Serving all of ARRL members in the Delaware, Eastern Pennsylvania,
Maryland/DC, Northern New York, Southern New Jersey, Western New York
and Western Pennsylvania ARRL Sections.
ARRL – The National Association for Amateur Radio™

——————————————————————–
ARRL Atlantic Division
Director: Thomas J Abernethy, W3TOM
w3tom@arrl.org
——————————————————————–

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House Passes Amateur Radio Parity Act

Amateur Radio Parity Act Passes in the US House of Representatives!
Washington, DC, 09/14/2016 (from ARRL)
“The bill is passed without objection.” With those words, Amateur Radio history was made on September 12, when the US House of Representatives approved the Amateur Radio Parity Act, H.R. 1301 on a voice vote under a suspension of the rules. The focus of the campaign to enact the legislation into law now shifts to the US Senate. Amateur Radio Parity Act Logo_11The House victory culminated many years of effort on ARRL’s part to gain legislation that would enable radio amateurs living in deed-restricted communities to erect antennas that support Amateur Radio communication. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” While similar bills in past years gained some traction on Capitol Hill, it was not until the overwhelming grassroots support from the Amateur Radio community for H.R. 1301 shepherded by ARRL that a bill made it this far. The legislation faces significant obstacles to passage in the US Senate, however.

“This is huge step in our effort to enact legislation that will allow radio amateurs who live in deed-restricted communities the ability to construct an effective outdoor antenna,” ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said. “Thanks to everyone for their help in this effort thus far. Now we must turn our full attention to getting the bill passed in the Senate.”

ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike Lisenco, N2YBB, who chairs the ARRL Board’s Legislative Advocacy Committee, has been heavily involved in efforts to move H.R. 1301 forward. “This has been a multiyear effort that is finally seeing some light,” he said. “The passage of the bill in the House is a major accomplishment, due to the hard work of so many — from the rank-and-file member to the officers and directors.”

Lisenco said it’s not a time to rest on our laurels. “We are only halfway there. The focus now shifts to our effort in the Senate,” he said. “We are beginning a massive e-mail campaign in which we need every member to write their two Senators using our simplified process. You will be hearing from President Roderick and from your Directors, asking you to go to our ‘Rally Congress’ page. Using your ZIP code, e-mails will be generated much like our recent letter campaign. You’ll fill in your name and address and press Enter. The e-mails will be sent directly to your Senators without you having to search through their websites.”

Lisenco said getting these e-mails to members’ Senators is a critical part of the process. “Those numbers matter! Please help us help you by participating in this effort,” he said.

As the amended bill provides, “Community associations should fairly administer private land-use regulations in the interest of their communities, while nevertheless permitting the installation and maintenance of effective outdoor Amateur Radio antennas. There exist antenna designs and installations that can be consistent with the aesthetics and physical characteristics of land and structures in community associations while accommodating communications in the Amateur Radio services.”

During this week’s limited debate, the House bill’s sponsor, Rep Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), thanked ARRL and the Community Associations Institute (CAI) for reaching an agreement to move the bill forward “in a bipartisan and very positive manner.” He pointed out to his colleagues that Amateur Radio antennas are prohibited outright in some areas.

“For some this is merely a nuisance,” Kinzinger said, “but for others — those that use their Amateur Radio license for life-saving emergency communications — a dangerous situation can be created by limiting their ability to establish effective communication for those in need.”

Kinzinger said that in emergencies, hams can provide “a vital and life-saving function” when conventional communication systems are down. He also praised the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), a US Department of Defense-sponsored program, comprised largely of Amateur Radio volunteers, that also supports communication during emergencies and disasters.

Cosponsor US Rep Joe Courtney (D-CT) also urged the bill’s passage. “This is not just a feel-good bill,” Courtney said, recounting how Hurricane Sandy brought down the power grid, and “we saw all the advanced communications we take for granted…completely fall by the wayside.” Ham radio volunteers provided real-time communication in the storm’s wake, he said, saying the legislation was a way “to rebalance things” for radio amateurs who choose to live in deed-restricted neighborhoods by enabling them to install “non-intrusive antennas.”

Courtney noted that he spoke recently with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, and said that Wheeler “strongly supports this legislation.”

Leading up to the vote, Rep Paul Tonko (D-NY) also spoke in support of the legislation, calling it a commonsense approach that would build “fairness into the equation for Amateur Radio operators” in dealing with homeowners associations.

The earlier U.S. Senate version of the Amateur Radio Parity Act, S. 1685, no longer is in play, and the Senate is expected to vote by unanimous consent on the version of H.R. 1301 that was adopted by the House on September 12.

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Happy Thanksgiving – We Remember

Thanksgiving-Turkey-Dinner-Table2

 

Happy Thanksgiving everybody! This is a traditional time to spend with family and friends, and to remember all those who are no longer with us.

I remember in the early days of the club, that there was a day-long QSO on the DuBois Repeater with hams far and wide in the Quad-County area checking in and out and back in again as their family activities permitted.

My Elmer, K3TFL was the unofficial Master of Ceremonies for those sessions, and the discussions ranged from what was for dinner, to the snowy weather to how to modify an ARC-5.

For our Quad-County hams, our repeater was the “Social Media” of the day. We all knew each other and stayed in touch on the air, making friends and sharing our thoughts all over the coverage area. This regular repeater contact with each other made for stronger friendships, and brought our disparate communities together in a spirit of cooperation and good will. Sadly, repeaters have fallen into disuse, and the social connections have withered away to a great extent.

I wonder; what would happen if we all made the effort to pick up the microphone, and reach out to each other today, and into the future? Would we find a renewed interest in local ham radio, and perhaps make a new ham radio friend or two? The only way to find out is to give it a try.

Why not fire up the radio today, and see who’s on the repeater? I’ll see you… on the air!

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